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Marylanders cut back on driving

Marylanders are driving less these days, according to a report by the Maryland PIRG Foundation, a public interest research group.

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Marylanders are driving less, report says

You may not notice it from your daily commute but Marylanders are driving less. Marylanders have cut their per-person driving miles by 4 percent since 2005, according to a new report from the Maryland PIRG Foundation. The decline mirrors a national trend. Across the U.S., 45 states have reduced per-person driving since 2005, the report said.

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End of 'driving boom' spurs talk of reshaping state transportation plans

"Given these trends, we need to press the reset button on our transportation policy," Guy said. "Just because past transportation investments overwhelmingly went to highway construction doesn't mean that continues to be the right choice for Maryland's future."

Report | Maryland PIRG | Transit

Moving Off The Road

After sixty years of almost constant increases in the annual number of miles Americans drive, since 2004 Americans have decreased their driving per-capita for eight years in a row. Driving miles per person are down especially sharply among Millennials, America’s largest generation that will increasingly dominate national transportation trends. But some skeptics have suggested that the apparent end of the Driving Boom might be just a temporary hiccup in the trend toward more driving for Americans. By the time Americans took notice of the decline in driving, the economy was in deep recession. Would economic growth bring back rapid increases in driving? Doubts about whether the Driving Boom has ended make it easier to postpone choices about transforming our transportation system or enacting reforms that disrupt well-established interest groups.

News Release | Maryland PIRG | Transit

New Report Shows Marylanders Are Driving Less

Baltimore – Marylanders have cut their per-person driving miles by 4.08 percent since 2005, while the nation’s long term driving boom appears to have ended, according to a new report from the Maryland PIRG Foundation.

Yesterday we released a new report, Transportation and the New Generation: Why Young People are Driving Less and What it Means for Transportation Policy, that shows that young people in particular are decreasing the amount they drive and increasing their use of transportation alternatives.

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Transportation and the New Generation

From World War II until just a few years ago, the number of miles driven annually on America’s roads steadily increased. Then, at the turn of the century, something changed: Americans began driving less. By 2011, the average American was driving 6 percent fewer miles per year than in 2004. The trend away from driving has been led by young people.

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The Right Track

America’s highways and airports are increasingly congested. Our nation’s transportation system remains dependent on oil. And our existing transportation infrastructure is inadequate to the demands of the 21st century. The United States should build an efficient and fast passenger rail network, with high-speed rail as a central component, to help address the nation’s transportation challenges in the 21st century.

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Road Work Ahead

To fix our roads and bridges, America first must fix our transportation policies. To counteract the tendencies to neglect repair and maintenance, we must adopt strong “fix-it first” rules that give priority to maintenance of our existing roads and bridges, set national goals for the condition of our transportation system, and hold state governments accountable for achieving results.

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A Track Record of Success

As America moves toward construction of new high-speed rail networks in regions throughout the country, we have much to learn from experiences abroad. High-speed rail lines have operated for more than 45 years in Japan and for three decades in Europe, providing a wealth of information about what the United States can expect from high-speed rail and how we can receive the greatest possible benefits from our investment.

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