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04/10/2014
Blog Post

DO NOT rush to change your passwords on all of your favorite websites. You shouldn’t change your password on a site until the site has fixed the Heartbleed bug, or else you risk having your new password compromised. Watch for a notice on the site, but don’t click any links in emails claiming to be from the website.

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04/02/2014
News Release

Today the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in McCutcheon v. FEC to strike down overall, or aggregate, contribution limits to candidates and political committees. Maryland PIRG research found that this ruling could bring $1 billion in additional campaign contributions from fewer than 2,800 elite donors through the 2020 election cycle.

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02/24/2014
Blog Post

In light of the recent news on campus, MaryPIRG Student Chapters want to remind students that there are ways to protect yourself and your personal information. 

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01/28/2014
News Release

Today, a survey released by Maryland PIRG and the Student Government Association at the University of Maryland shows that 65% of student consumers have opted out of buying a college textbook due to its high price, and nearly half say that textbook costs can dictate whether they take a course.

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PIRG In The News

The Baltimore Business Journal

You may not notice it from your daily commute but Marylanders are driving less. Marylanders have cut their per-person driving miles by 4 percent since 2005, according to a new report from the Maryland PIRG Foundation. The decline mirrors a national trend. Across the U.S., 45 states have reduced per-person driving since 2005, the report said.

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The Baltimore Sun

Nearly 1 billion recyclable beverage containers will get trashed instead of recycled in Maryland this summer alone. Our low container recycling rate has serious consequences for public health, climate pollution and our quality of life.

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The New York Times

Given the history of shady dealings between banks and colleges, Congress needs to take a hard look at the increasingly common practice of schools contracting with banks to disburse financial aiddollars to students.

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Time Magazine

Thought the student loan crisis was bad as it is? Now add hefty fees into that mix. Providers say students can avoid the fees that pile up when they elect to receive their financial aid on a debit card, but new research from a consumer advocacy group finds that these companies throw up roadblocks to keep the fee revenue rolling in, even as colleges make big bucks off their affiliations with these institutions.

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